Archive

Tag Archives: Internet and Technology

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine how men who sell sex to men perceive the risks in this activity and what experiences they have of actual denigration, threats, and violence in their relations with customers. We also discuss the self-defense strategies they have used to protect themselves. The study is based on an Internet survey on Swedish websites. Statistical analyses have been carried out, and in interpreting the results, Finkelhor and Asdigian’s revised routine activities theory has been used. The results show that the vulnerability of sellers of sex is greatest during the time when the sexual act is being performed, and that this is primarily linked to the customer’s antagonism and seeking gratification by overstepping agreed boundaries, particularly with regard to sexual services including BDSM. Their vulnerability was also connected to the seller’s diminished capacity for self-protection due to personal and external pressures. A smaller proportion of the men described risk prevention activities. These involved refusing a customer after an initial contact, protecting themselves from infection, being on their guard during the whole process, selecting the place, and deciding not to carry out certain sexual acts. An important implication concerns the occupational health and safety that men who sell sex to men can develop for themselves, while remaining within the law. International studies have demonstrated that selling sex in collective, indoor forms provides the greatest security. For decades, Swedish prostitution policy has had the ambition of reducing prostitution through targeting those who purchase sex, and those who promote prostitution in criminal legislation. This effectively prevents more systematic and collective attempts to create safer conditions for selling sex. In conclusion, it can be stated that while it is legal to sell sex in Sweden, this is done at the seller’s own risk.

Advertisements

.
Most literature on prostitution centres exclusively on street and female sex workers. Considering the lack of inclusion of trans sex workers within research agendas and public policies, in this article I analyse websites where trans women offer their services in Portugal and the UK. I examine the way trans women escorts present themselves to potential clients through detailed descriptions of their bodies’ sizes, physical attributes, personal characteristics and lovemaking skills, and how they negotiate gender, nationality, race, ethnicity and sexuality in relation to the cultural and socio-economic demands of the market. An intersectional framework provides the critical perspective from which to consider how certain trans narratives are displayed through these online advertisements while decentring hegemonic notions (mainly, white and middle class) of representing trans experiences. This exploratory research aims to better understand the online trans sex industry as a place of empowerment where ‘beautiful’ trans escorts can strategically position themselves in order to succeed in a competitive market and, simultaneously, lay claim for a certain degree of (finite) recognition.

The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic content analysis of sex tour websites to understand how sex tours are marketed to potential clients. A total of 380 web pages from 21 sex tour websites were reviewed. The sex tour websites sought to promote privacy and hassle-free travel with a local ‘escort’ and the opportunity for ‘hooks-ups’ with no strings attached. Three themes emerged around the description of sex workers: (1) enjoyment and complete acceptance, (2) a ‘total girlfriend experience’ and (3) exoticisation of the ‘Third World’ woman. The majority of the sex tourism websites used marketplace mythologies concerning racism, sexism and imperialism to appeal to sex tourists’ desires for fantasy experiences, power and domination, and a renewed sense of identity. Legal and STI-related information was largely missing from the websites, and when it was included it was aimed at protecting sex tourists, not sex workers. It is of importance for researchers, social workers and others engaging with sex workers and sexscapes to recognise the power of language, cultural myths and framings and their ability to generate real-world social and health implications.
Social Policy and Society, January 2015: Themed Section on The Cultural Study of Commercial Sex: Taking a Policy Perspective.
.
Berg, Heather. “Trafficking Policy, Meaning Making and State Violence.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 145–55. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000414.
Carline, Anna, and Jane Scoular. “Saving Fallen Women Now? Critical Perspectives on Engagement and Support Orders and Their Policy of Forced Welfarism.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 103–12. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000347.
Hammond, Natalie. “Men Who Pay for Sex and the Sex Work Movement? Client Responses to Stigma and Increased Regulation of Commercial Sex Policy.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 93–102. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000360.
———. “Some Useful Sources.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 157–59. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000451.
Hammond, Natalie, and Feona Attwood. “Introduction: The Cultural Study of Commercial Sex: Taking a Policy Perspective.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 79–82. doi:10.1017/S147474641400044X.
Pettinger, Lynne. “The Judgement Machine: Markets, Internet Technologies and Policies in Commercial Sex.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 135–43. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000311
Pitcher, Jane. “Sex Work and Modes of Self-Employment in the Informal Economy: Diverse Business Practices and Constraints to Effective Working.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 113–23. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000426. OPEN ACCESS
Prior, Jason, and Penny Crofts. “Is Your House a Brothel? Prostitution Policy, Provision of Sex Services from Home, and the Maintenance of Respectable Domesticity.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 125–34. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000335.
Sanders, Teela, Kate Hardy, and Rosie Campbell. “Regulating Strip-Based Entertainment: Sexual Entertainment Venue Policy and the Ex/Inclusion of Dancers’ Perspectives and Needs.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 83–92. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000323.

Sex Work for the Middle Classes

Author:
Elizabeth Bernstein
Sexualities October 2007 vol. 10 no. 4473-488

Abstract

Drawing from fieldwork and interviews with middle-class sex workers, this essay considers the relationship between the class-privileged women and men who are increasingly finding their way into sex work and more generalized patterns of economic restructuring. How has the emergence of new communications technologies transformed the meaning and experience of sexual commerce for sex workers and their customers? What is the connection between the new `respectability’ of sexual commerce and the new classes of individuals who now participate in commercial sexual transactions? This essay concludes by exploring some of the key transformations that are occurring within middle-class commercial sexual encounters, including the emergence of `bounded authenticity’ (an authentic, yet bounded, interpersonal connection) as a particularly desirable and sought-after sexual commodity.

 

Read full article here.