Archive

Monthly Archives: February 2015

Uhl, Bärbel, et. al: Data Protection Challenges in Anti-Trafficking Policies – A Practical Guide, 2015.

The European NGO initiative datACT – data protection in anti-trafficking action published the practical guide “Data Protection Challenges in Anti-Trafficking Policies”.

The publication offers an overview of the relevant European data protection provisions, a methodology to conduct privacy impact assessments for anti-trafficking NGO service providers, an analysis for the privacy rights claims for trafficked persons, and data protection standards for NGO service providers. Moreover, the study contains an elaboration of legal arguments that lead in 2013 to the failure of mandatory registration of sex workers in the Netherlands.

http://www.datact-project.org/en/materials/study.html

P. Hubbard and J. Prior, “Out of sight, out of mind? Prostitution policy and the health, well-being and safety of home-based sex workers” Critical Social Policy February 2013 vol. 33 no. 1 140-159

Abstract:

Policy discussions relating to the selling of sex have tended to fixate on two spaces of sex work: the street and the brothel. Such preoccupation has arguably eclipsed discussion of the working environment where most sex is sold, namely, the private home. Redressing this omission, this paper discusses the public health and safety implications of policies that fail to regulate or assist the ‘hidden population’ of sex workers, focusing on the experiences of home-based workers in Sydney, Australia. Considering the inconsistent way that Home Occupation Sex Services Premises (HOSSPs) are regulated in this city, this paper discusses the implications of selling sex beyond the gaze of the state and the law. It is concluded that working from home can allow sex workers to exercise considerable autonomy over their working practices, but that the safety of such premises must be carefully considered in the development of prostitution policy.

Full text available here.

Social Policy and Society, January 2015: Themed Section on The Cultural Study of Commercial Sex: Taking a Policy Perspective.
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Berg, Heather. “Trafficking Policy, Meaning Making and State Violence.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 145–55. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000414.
Carline, Anna, and Jane Scoular. “Saving Fallen Women Now? Critical Perspectives on Engagement and Support Orders and Their Policy of Forced Welfarism.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 103–12. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000347.
Hammond, Natalie. “Men Who Pay for Sex and the Sex Work Movement? Client Responses to Stigma and Increased Regulation of Commercial Sex Policy.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 93–102. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000360.
———. “Some Useful Sources.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 157–59. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000451.
Hammond, Natalie, and Feona Attwood. “Introduction: The Cultural Study of Commercial Sex: Taking a Policy Perspective.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 79–82. doi:10.1017/S147474641400044X.
Pettinger, Lynne. “The Judgement Machine: Markets, Internet Technologies and Policies in Commercial Sex.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 135–43. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000311
Pitcher, Jane. “Sex Work and Modes of Self-Employment in the Informal Economy: Diverse Business Practices and Constraints to Effective Working.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 113–23. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000426. OPEN ACCESS
Prior, Jason, and Penny Crofts. “Is Your House a Brothel? Prostitution Policy, Provision of Sex Services from Home, and the Maintenance of Respectable Domesticity.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 125–34. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000335.
Sanders, Teela, Kate Hardy, and Rosie Campbell. “Regulating Strip-Based Entertainment: Sexual Entertainment Venue Policy and the Ex/Inclusion of Dancers’ Perspectives and Needs.” Social Policy and Society 14, no. 01 (2015): 83–92. doi:10.1017/S1474746414000323.

Hubbard P, Boydell S, Crofts P, Prior J, Searle G, 2013, “Noxious neighbours? Interrogating the impacts of sex premises in residential areas” Environment and Planning A 45(1) 126 – 141

Abstract:

Premises associated with commercial sex—including brothels, striptease clubs, sex cinemas, and sex shops—have increasingly been accepted as legitimate land uses, albeit ones whose location needs to be controlled because of assumed ‘negative externalities’. However, the planning and licensing regulations excluding such premises from areas of residential land use are often predicated on assumptions of nuisance that have not been empirically substantiated. Accordingly, this paper reports on a survey of those living close to sex industry premises in New South Wales, Australia. The results suggest that although some residents have strong moral objections to sex premises, in general residents note few negative impacts on local amenity or quality of life, with distance from a premise being a poor predictor of residents’ experiences of nuisance. These findings are considered in relation to the literatures on sexuality and space given regulation which ultimately appears to reproduce heteronormative moralities rather than respond to genuine environmental nuisances.


Full text available here.